Ground Up: Warmun Artists’ Fundraiser for Warmun Community, WA — 3 to 10 December 2016

Artists: Betty Carrington, Sadie Carrington, Lorraine Daylight, Mabel Juli, Nancy Nodea, Peggy Patrick, Shirley Purdie, Rammy Ramsey, Jessica Ramsey, Phyllis Thomas.
 
Exhibition 3 to 10 December 2016.
 
Opening Talk at 3pm Saturday 3 December by Kevin Lowe (Gubbi Gubbi) on community Aboriginal language programs.

The artist talk coincides with the Sydney East Artwalk on the same day.

Kevin Lowe is Deputy Chairperson of the Federation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages (FATSIL), the peak advocacy body for Aboriginal community language programs, and involved in the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group. His work with the Board of Studies has focused on working with Aboriginal communities, schools and education systems in establishing programs that centre the development of learning partnerships.
 
Warmun Artists’ Fundraiser for Warmun Community
Two-way sharing and learning lie at the heart of the tiny community at Warmun. Gija educators emphasise the importance of a culturally appropriate pedagogy that expresses ideas and concepts in specific Gija ways. The famed Warmun Art Movement itself emerged with the ideal of two-way education when Gija elders enlisted the support of the Sisters of St Joseph, the Order Founded by Mary MacKillop. Sister Theresa Morellini OAM (Sister T.) arrived in Warmun in May 1979 as one of the first two teachers at Ngalangangpum School. Sister T. says: 'Two-way was what the elders wanted. They came up with the name to describe the importance of Western way and Gija way'. Another way that knowledge was passed down was through art. She says: 'The old people would paint the Dreamtime (Ngarrangkarni) stories on any bits of scrap to teach the children'. These teachers of lore and culture at Ngalangangpum School became renowned artists including Rover Thomas, Queenie McKenzie, Hector Jandanny and George Mung Mung (all deceased). (Veronica Ryan, From Digging Sticks to Writing Sticks. Stories of Kija Women, 2001.) The artists have donated their works to continue their work.

Mabel Juli, Jumuluny, Labany and Derranel, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #414/14

Nancy Nodea, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #499/14

Rammey Ramsey, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #172/15

Lorraine Daylight, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #490/15

Evelyn Malgil, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #47/16

Sade Carrington, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #493/16

Jessica Ramsay, Kangaroo Dreaming, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #131/16

Peggy Patrick, Untitled, 45 x 45 cm / Natural ochre and pigments on canvas, #412/15

About Ground Up
Ground Up Community Support Network Ltd (‘Ground Up’) is a charitable organisation established to deliver services to support the wellbeing of Gija and other Aboriginal people in the East Kimberley region of WA. So far our projects have been delivered in Warmun community (Turkey Creek).
 
Our activities have focussed on facilitating the transmission of cultural knowledge from elders to younger people and providing positive activities for young people. This has been in response to Gija elder’s sense of urgency about the need to engage younger people in the transmission of cultural knowledge and promote positive activities and choices for young people.
 
Gija is classified as a critically endangered language as its only fluent speakers are the community’s grandparents and great-grandparents. Ongoing funding for this language and culture program is one of the challenges Gija people face. There is currently very limited support for language programs in the region.
 
Funds raised will help the crucially important weekly language teaching and maintenance program that enables Gija Elders to pass their knowledge of Gija language and culture to their family and community members. The program is held at Ngalangangpum School, Purnululu School, Wanyanyakem Taam Early Learning Centre and Warmun Aged Care. Previous programs have been held at the Warmun Art Centre and out on bush trips.


Presented by The Cross Art Projects and Ground Up in association with Warmun Art Centre at http://warmunart.com.au/

 

Ground Up opening

Thanks to the wonderful speakers at the Ground Up opening: Yvonne Weldon, Chairperson of the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, for a generous Welcome to country; academic and educator Kevin Lowe who spoke on the importance of Aboriginal language projects and communities supporting communities and Christine Mason and the wonderful Ground Up family for the party.

Ground Up opening speakers (left to right): Yvonne Weldon, Chairperson of the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, gave a generous Welcome to country; academic and educator Kevin Lowe spoke on the importance of Aboriginal language projects and communities supporting communities; unknown;  Christine Mason, Ground Up director.

Kevin Lowe, Gubbi Gubbi academic and educator spoke on the importance of Aboriginal language projects.

Friends of Ground Up and friends of Warmun community (including Betty Carrington's grand-daughters).


Links
http://groundupcommunity.org/
If you would like to contribute to GROUND UP to help this work continue into the future please donate at: http://groundupcommunity.org/donate
See also: Ngali-Ngalim-Boorroo (For the Women), http://crossart.com.au/archive/97-2014-exhibitions-projects/264-ngali-ngalim-boorroo-for-the-women
From the exhibition Curating Feminism, at Sydney College of the Arts Gallery, for Contemporary Art and Feminism > Download pdf