• Opening of Raquel Ormella’s graphic novel 'Joan Kerr and the Mysterious Vanessa’

    25 June 2016

  • Opening of Raquel Ormella’s graphic novel 'Joan Kerr and the Mysterious Vanessa’

    25 June 2016

  • Opening of Raquel Ormella’s graphic novel 'Joan Kerr and the Mysterious Vanessa’

    25 June 2016

Rivers of Shame, Patrice Newell & Julie Sheppard — 18 July 2007

18 July 2007

Help Change Policy & Stop Our Water Being Ripped Off!
Visit the websites: www.riverssos.com - www.tec.org.au

Make a Submission: to the Inquiry into Underground Coal Mining in the Southern Coalfield (stretching from Sydney to the Southern Highlands) until 30 July 2007.
Submissions must address the terms of reference. See terms at Department of Planning www.planning.nsw.gov.au/planningsystem/panels.asp

Post: Southern Coalfield Panel Secretariat, c/- Department of Planning, GPO Box 39, Sydney 2001. E: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Inquiry’s terms of reference don’t even mention the water supply catchments. The Inquiry is directed to trade off revenue with stopping coal mining-related damage to essential water supplies. In any case, the Minister for Planning, Frank Sartor, has unfettered powers to approve extensions to leases under Part 3A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (1979).

Other Links

Exhibitions

The Trouble with the Weather: UTS Gallery, July 2007; www.utsgallery.uts.edu.au
Roni Horn: Vatnasafn/Library of Water, Iceland 2007
www.libraryofwater.is; www.artangel.org.uk (commissioning agency)
Alison Clouston & Boyd: www.burragorang.org

Rivers & Climate Change Campaigners

Rivers SOS
www.riverssos.com
The Total Environment Centre
www.tec.org.au
Colong Foundation for Wilderness
www.colongwilderness.org.au/CatchmentMining/CatchmentMining.htm
Save the Drip
www.savethedrip.com
Water First, Sutherland Shire
www.waterfirst.localaction.com.au
Sutherland Shire Environment Centre
www.ssec.org.au
Rising Tide Newcastle
www.risingtide.org.au
Nature Conservation Council
www.nccnsw.org.au

State Government Coal Mining Approvals Process


DOP Department of Planning www.planning.nsw.gov.au
DOP is a consent authority for mining as it manages the conditions of consent that are placed on any mine before the mine gains approval from the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) to commence mining. The Minister is Frank Sartor.
DMR Department of Mineral Resources www.minerals.nsw.gov.au
DPI Department of Primary Industries www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/
The Department of Mineral Resources is the primary consent authority for coal mining as it grants mining leases. It comes under the umbrella of the Department of Primary Industries (DPI). The Minister is Ian Macdonald. DMR conducts a Commission of Inquiry (CoI) for each new mining lease that it grants. DMR must consider the environmental impact of certain activities. The company develops a mine plan, which may include an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and which must gain approval from the Department of Planning before the actual mining can commence. There is no requirement for DPI to display a Review of Environmental Factors (REF) or receive submissions from the community.

Special Thanks:
Patrice Newell, Climate Change Coalition and Julie Sheppard, secretary Rivers SOS. Thanks also to Dave Burgess, Total Environment Centre; Bob Percival, Woolloomooloo Film Society; Lisa Havilah, Campbelltown Art Centre and Vivian Vidulich, Wollongong City Gallery.

Download show catalogue Undermining Rivers

 

cc03water_flier.jpg

cc06TW_drinker1.jpg cc08TW_catchment.jpg cc10TW_beaker1.jpg
Deborah Vaughan, Stop Flogging off Water, July 2007, flier. Download full pdf
Toni Warburton, Transactions to Catchment, 1990-2007. * More information below

Toni Warburton, Catchment Studies: volume 4. Cover of artist book

Toni Warburton, Rain water in a glass, 1999. Lithograph.

 

* Drinker, 1990, (Transactions effigy 1), detail. Effigy gesso and pigment on moulded paper pulp over welded metal.

Transactions Evocation 3, 1990–2007.

Graphite wall text:

'At the end of his dinner, even when he is no longer thirsty, he is always seen with the air of an epicure who holds his glass for some exquisite liquor, to fill his glass with pure water, take it by sips and swallow it drop by drop. But what adds much interest to this scene is the place where it occurs. It is near the window, with his eyes turned towards the country that our drinker stands. As if in this moment of happiness, this child of nature tries to unite the only two good things that have survived his loss of liberty: a drink of limpid water and the sight of sun and country.'

Reference: Jean Marc Gaspard, The Wild Boy of Aveyron, ‘Functions of the senses’, chapter XVI. Translated from the French by Century Psychology Series, 1932. First published: Itard, ‘De l’Éducation d’un homme sauvage, ou des Premiers développements physiques et moraux du jeune sauvage de l’Aveyron’, Paris, 1801.