• One too many

    12 March to 30 April 2022

One too many

One too many
12 March to 30 April 2022

Artists from Iltja Ntjarra: Benita Clements, Selma Coulthard, Dellina Inkamala, Delray Inkamala, Dianne Inkamala, Vanessa Inkamala , Reinhold Inkamala, Mervyn Rubuntja, Betty Wheeler Namatjira, Marcus Wheeler with Chips Mackinolty.


Saturday 12 March, 3pm: Opening Conversation

Patricia Adjei, (Wuthathi/Mabuiag Island), Head of First Nations Arts & Culture, Sector Development and Strategic Partnerships, Australia Council i

Ken McGregor, author of A life and times of Albert Namatjira (2021)  and Iris Bendor, Itlja Ntjarra, manager.

Profits from the sale of this book go to Iltja Ntjarra Many Hands Art Centre.

Saturday 19 March, 2 pm: Michael Kempson of Cicada Press at UNSW, on prints made by the artists in 2016 and 2019.

Note: the artists and co-curators of One Too Many will attend the exhibition and the Biennale of Sydney installation, when the Covid crisis in Mparntwe (Alice Springs) stabilises.

Iltja Ntjarra in Rivus, Sydney Briennale: Watch  ‘Pmarra Nurna-kanha Ntarntarai / Care for our Country’: https://vimeo.com/680713927/79248ad8a3 and explore Rivus at https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/ 

One Too Many, Digital Catalogue > Download as pdf

About

‘The landscape is telling us that the situation was good and healthy before, but now there are diseases and suffering.’ — Vanessa Inkamala 1

One Too Many is one in a series of de-colonising exhibitions and projects presented by the powerhouse Iltja Ntjarra / Many Hands Art Centre located in Mparntwe (Alice Springs). Albert Namatjira’s watercolour heritage and Central Australia’s blindingly glorious landscapes are celebrated and carefully overlaid with images of modernity or juxtaposed with subtle whispering or agit-prop manifestos. Decades on, these artists are the third and now fourth generation of Namatjira’s family and kin.

The project’s chorus is, ‘Tjina Nurna-ka, Pmarra Nurn-kanha, Itla Itla Nurn-kanha / Our family, our country, our legacy, does not change.’ – Iltja Ntjarra Artists.
Iltja Ntjarra artists are back in Sydney with two powerful exhibitions. Pmarra nurna-kanha ntarntarai—Care for Our Country (Rivus, the 23rd Biennale of Sydney, 2022), is presented at The Cutaway in Barangaroo, and the sister installation, One Too Many, here at The Cross Art Projects. Both installations are comprised of paintings on re-purposed road signs or industrial refuge. They are beautiful and witty, but they are also heart breaking. José Roca, Artistic Director of the Sydney Biennale, is wise and alert to the fact that, ‘sustainability should be an action, not a theme’.

One Too Many opens a window onto the rivers of grog that blight lives and litter landscapes. If you’ve had one too many, you have drunk too much alcohol. As you enter The Cross Art Projects you are greeted by a tourist map, a road and an installation of flattened and painted beer cans: wreckage collected on the road to old Hermannsburg, a former Lutheran mission and museum, and new mission and surrounding outstations. Your scenic journey runs between National Parks: Tjoritja West MacDonnell Ranges and Finke Gorge.

You examine the series of red, blue and yellow crushed and re-burnished aluminium cans and on each is a vignette—a miniature painting that recalls country and western songs about roads that ‘take me home’. The road crosses land that is home to the Western Aranda people. The trip is marked by modified and re-purposed road signs warning us to ‘slow’, and the occasional minutely detailed drinkers’ camp. Vanessa Inkamala and Selma Coulthard, the exhibition’s artist/curatorial elders and other participants, have painted ‘distance to destination’ markers counting-down the journey.

At journey’s end is an old stone church where Selma Coulthard warns, ‘You will end up unless you stop drinking.’ Ntaria (Hermannsburg) is not far from Mparntwe (Alice Springs) and has a history of grog-running. But you could be singing your heart out as you travel on any Australian country road, blithely passing signs of an epidemic of alcohol abuse. In Mparntwe drinks are ordered by colours that identify cheap full-strength or heavy beer brands. In a pub, cans are often thrown at drinkers.

Logos from bottle shop chains feature in the exhibition, such as Selma Coulthard’s wry road sign with a Thirsty Camel (a marketing franchise). Artist Chips Mackinolty reworks Woolworths’ faux-urbane Dan Murphys bottle-shop brand: ‘guaranteeing* higher death price’. These logos expose an ugly reality: most Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory are dry by choice, so rivers of grog flow out of bottle shops and down to riverbeds and grog-runners on backroads. The money flows up stream.
For the 2012 exhibition, The Endurance of Bush Medicine and accompanying publication The Art of Healing 2, artist and Iltja Ntjarra chair, Mervyn Rubuntja wrote about his experience with alcohol: ‘One time, in 1999, I had problems in my liver. I admit that I had consumed too much alcohol at the time. The doctor told me that I had three or four days to live. My in-laws prepared the drink from young gum tree leaves; it was kept in a large drum. Every day for four days I drank a warm-temperature bottle full of it. I then healed, and the doctor couldn’t believe it! I haven’t drunk alcohol for years and I don’t drink any more. I am convinced that bush medicines are better than white man’s medicines.’ 3

Academic Marcia Langton has for many years identified and written on the colonial guarantee of ‘rum, seduction and death’. Australian governments are willing captives of the grog lobby and their ‘fun’ campaigns. The industry fights any attempt to constrain supply or restrict their operations. Aboriginal communities across the Territory defend their culture and have repeatedly resisted attempts by the alcohol industry to make inroads into their lives. Usually it is the Women’s Night Patrols that defend and try to shield families from domestic violence.

Chips Mackinolty has a long history working for Aboriginal run health organisations. In Darwin he opened the exhibition Groggy (NCCA, 2013) by reminding viewers, ‘Everyone assumes that grog is an exclusively Aboriginal problem. That is simply not true. Around 50% of Aboriginal people don’t drink at all.’ Health coalitions continue to battle alcohol corporations to ensure their engagement contributes to the empowerment, recognition and self-determination of First Nations peoples. Mackinolty’s installation in One Too Many is a line-up of miniature counter-propaganda posters. They assisted a five-year battle against a proposal to locate the Territory’s biggest bottle shop beside three dry Darwin communities located just down the road from the airport.

Alcohol companies rely on exploiting risky drinking, with 5% of the Australian population drinking over a third of all alcohol used—averaging approximately 8 standard drinks per day per person. This group of people is targeted when they might be feeling particularly vulnerable. 5 The Darwin campaign against Dan Murphys was successful, however under investor pressure, Woolworths who also own the BWS chain, simply changed the parent company name to Endeavour Drinks: to continue holding their hugely profitable alcohol and gambling revenue streams.

In mid-2016, Iltja Ntjarra artists invited leading Australian artist Tony Albert to hold collage workshops, confronting matters like homelessness and health—key issues the Federal Intervention into Northern Territory Indigenous communities has failed to address. 6 From these and other workshops, emerged inspired and collectively executed counter-intervention artworks. In NIRIN, the 2020 Sydney Biennale curated by Brook Andrew, the artists’ presented mobile ‘Homeless’ works painted on plastic ‘divorce bags’.
The sister exhibition, titled Particulate Matter: A Fossil Fuelled Future at The Cross Art Projects, presented works mapping the gas pipeline from Mereenie and Palm Valley Gas Fields (you pass them on your trip to Hermannsburg), to export ports in Darwin and Queensland and its political framing as ‘Develop the North’. As with grog, the real intervention is corporate: mining— specifically industrial fracking, the industry’s theft of the waters of artesian rivers and continued alienation and displacement of traditional owners.

Albert Namatjira and the generations that followed are resilient and tenacious. They do not fight alone. In 1995, Dr Charles Perkins called a public meeting in Mpartwe to stem the rivers of grog and the damage done. In the sublime One Too Many, the fight continues.

https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/ 

Footnotes

1. Vanessa Inkamala Namatjira, ‘Talking up strong for country’ in Living Tradition, Ilta Ntjarra Art Centre, 1019, p.19.

2. The Art of Healing: Australian Indigenous Bush Medicine, edited by Jacqueline Healy, Melbourne University Medical Museum, 2012.

3. Mervyn Rubuntja, The Art of Healing: Australian Indigenous Bush Medicine, edited by Jacqueline Healy, Melbourne University Medical Museum, 2012, p.46.

4. The alcohol industry is currently lobbying the Federal Government to remove the payment of excise tax. This will drop the unit price and enable ‘cheaper’ grog. See: FARE objection to the Treasurer from 80 health organisations.

5. FARE in collaboration with the Centre for Alcohol Policy Research. The research uses the 2019 NDSHS data. See the FARE website at https://fare.org.au/new-report-alcohol-companies-reliant-on-people-who-drink-at-heaviest-levels/ 

6. Prime Minister John Howard dramatically introduced The Intervention on the eve of the 2006 Federal election.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Vanessa Inkamala, Winding Road, 2021, acrylic on sheet aluminium Recycled road sign, 75 x 75 cm (428-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Vanessa Inkamala, Beware Falling Rocks, 2021 Acrylic on sheet aluminium Recycled road sign, 75 x 75 cm, (449-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Selma Nunay Coulthard, Camel, 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium Recycled road sign, 75 x 75 cm (448-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Selma Nunay Coulthard, SLOW, 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium Recycled road sign, 60 x 60 cm (445-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Betty Wheeler Namatjira , Tjoritja, U 210 KM,  West MacDonnell Ranges NT, 2021 Acrylic on sheet aluminium, 45 x 45 cm, (498-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Marcus Wheeler, Utju / Areyonga, NT, U 10 km, 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium, Recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (500-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Selma Nunay Coulthard, 181 KM, 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium, Recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (427-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Betty Wheeler Namatjira , Tjoritja (West MacDonnell Ranges), 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium, Recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (499-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Selma Nunay Coulthard, HB 200 KM, 2022, Acrylic on sheet aluminium, Recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (31-22) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Vanessa Inkamala, Don’t Drink Drive, 2021, Acrylic on sheet aluminium, Recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (481-21) Photo—Belle Blau 

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(L) Delray Inkamala, Galah in the Bush, 2022 (4-22), (M) Dianne Inkamala, Old Windmill, 2021 (461-21) (R) Selma Nunay Coulthard, V8 Troopy, 2022 [32-22) Acrylic on found cans, Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(L) Dianne Inkamala, Two Galahs, 2021 (467-21) (M) Dianne Inkamala, Camping & Swimming, 2021 (469-21) (R) Delray Inkamala, Galah on a Branch, 2022, (6-22), Acrylic on found cans, Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(R) Delray Inkamala, Ntaria School, 2021, Acrylic on found can,(484-21) (L) Vanessa Inkamala, Cattle Yard, 2021, Acrylic on found can  (465-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(L) Mervyn Rubuntja, Old Hermannsburg Mission Church, 2021, Acrylic on found can (468-21) (R) Delray Inkamala, Parrot in the Bush, 2022, Acrylic on found can (5-22) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(L) Dianne Inkamala, Drink Driving, 2021, Acrylic on found can (462-21) (R) Benita Clement, Old Can, 2021 Acrylic on found can (457-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(L) Dianne Inkamala, Old Hermannsburg Mission Church, 2021, Acrylic on found can (471-21) (R) Vanessa Inkamala, Drink Driving, 2021, Acrylic on found can (463-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation works from Tjuwanpa Art Centre, Tjuwanpa Outstation, Artists (left to right): Michelle Pareroultja, Wild Passionfruit—Rraatninga, 2022 (#65-22); Delray Inkamala, Redtail Black Cockatoos—Erraarnta, 2022, (#73-22); Bromwyn Lankin, Wild Flower, 2022, (#69-22); Delray Inkamala, Redtail Black Cockatoos—Erraarnta, 2022, acrylic on recycled materials, 10 x 12 cm, (#74-22); Linda Ebatarinja, Wild Flowers, 2022,  (#70-22); Delray Inkamala, Galah—Elinta, 2022,  (#72-22); Ramona Malbunka, Bush Tomato Flower, 2022, (#67-22);; Linda Ebatarinja, Red Kangaroo—Arra, 2022,  (#71-22). All works Repurposed beer cans, acrylic on aluminum., Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

(Detail) Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja, recycled road sign, acrylic on sheet aluminium, 45 x 45cm (498-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

(Detail) Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja, U 210 KM West MacDonnell Ranges NT, 2021, acrylic on sheet aluminium, recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm (498-21) Photo—Belle Blau

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Chips Mackinolty, Damn Murphy's, 2021. Digital print, ed 1/3.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Chips Mackinolty, Damn Murphy's, 2021. Digital print, ed 1/3.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Chips Mackinolty, Damn Murphy's, 2021. Digital print, ed 1/3.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation: Selma Nunay Coulthard, SLOW, painting, 60cm x 60cm. (#445-21). Shelf: Delray Inkamala, Ntaria School, (484-21), Vanessa Inkamala, Drinking Grog, (472-21), Reinhold Inkamala, Cowboy and horse, 13 x 10 cm. (460-21), Dianne Inkamala, Two galahs, 14cm x 9cm. (467-21).  Vanessa Inkamala, Cattle yard, (465-21). Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation: Vanessa Inkamala, 80 km, painting, 60cm x 45cm. (#444-21). Background: Vanessa Inkamala, Winding Road, painting, 75 x 75 cm. (#428-21). Vanessa Inkamala, Beware Falling Rocks, painting, 75 x 75 cm. (#449-21). .Selma Nunay Coulthard, Camel, painting, 75 x 75 cm. (448-21)., Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Installation: Vanessa Inkamala, 80 km, painting, 60cm x 45cm. (#444-21). Background: Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja (U 210 km; West MacDonnell Ranges), NT, painting, 45 x 45cm. (#498-21). Marcus Wheeler, Utju / Areyonga, NT, (U 10 km), painting, 45 x 45 cm. (#500-21). Selma Nunay Coulthard, 181 km, painting, 45 x 45 cm. (427-21). Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja (West MacDonnell Ranges), NT, painting, 45 x 45cm. (499-21). Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation showing map and shelf detail: Dianne Inkamala, Rain clouds above windmill, (459-21), Mervyn Rubuntja, Old Hermannsburg Mission Church, 9 x 14 cm. (468-21), Dianne Inkamala, Old can, 10 x 14 cm. (458-21), Delray Inkamala, Parrot in the bush, 9 x 13 cm. (5-22), Delray Inkamala, Galah in the bush, 12 x 10 cm. (4-22)., Dianne Inkamala, Drink driving, (452-21), Dianne Inkamala, Old windmill, (481-21), Benita Clements, Old can, 8 x 14 cm. (457-21), Selma Nunay Coulthard, V8 Troopy (32-22), Dianne Inkamala, Old Hermannsburg Mission Church, (471-21), Dianne Inkamala, Camping and swimming, (469-21), Vanessa Inkamala, Drink driving, 9 x 13 cm. (463- Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation shot:  Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja (West MacDonnell Ranges), NT, painting, 45 x 45cm. (499-21). Selma Nunay Coulthard, HB 100 km, , 45 x 45 cm. (#31-22). 5Chips Mackinolty, Damn Murphy's 1, 2 and 3: Ed 1/3. Short Shelf detail: works from from Tjuwanpa Art Centre, Tjuwanpa Outstation). Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Installation: Chips Mackinolty, Damn Murphy's 1, 2 and 3: Ed 1/3., Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation: Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja (U 210 km; West MacDonnell Ranges), NT, painting, 45 x 45cm. (#498-21). Marcus Wheeler, Utju / Areyonga, NT, (U 10 km), painting, 45 x 45 cm. (#500-21). Selma Nunay Coulthard, 181 km, painting, 45 x 45 cm. (427-21). Betty Naparula Namatjira Wheeler, Tjoritja (West MacDonnell Ranges), NT, painting, 45 x 45cm. (499-21). Photo by Silversalt Photography., Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Installation shot, Photo by Silversalt Photography.

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

Benita Clements, Self-portrait in Simpson Gap. Watercolouur painting on recycled road sign, 45 x 45 cm. (#1-22).

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. Rise, 2021

Selma Nunay Coulthard, Give Way. Painting, 71cm x 81cm. (#450-21.) $2,415

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022

One too many, installation view, window showing Benita Clements and Selma Nunay Coulthard, Recycled Road Signs: watercolour (finished with cold wax).

About Iltja Ntjarra / Many Hands Art Centre

At Iltja Ntjarra / Many Hands Art Centre (founded 2004), descendants and relatives of Albert Namatjira (1902-1959), keep the Hermannsburg watercolour art movement strong. Famously the Hermannsburg watercolour school encoded in layers of wash, sacred sites and stories as naturalistic and secular. As Australia’s most celebrated mid-Twentieth Century artist, Namatjira’s talent was admired yet, for a long time, he was unable to buy land for his family to establish a home. Namatjira and his wife, Rubina, were the first Aboriginal people to be granted Australian citizenship in 1957. Yet soon after this he was accused of supplying alcohol to non-citizens within the community (a charge he denied) and was imprisoned for two months. Shortly after his release, at the age of 57, Namatjira died.

Six generations on, Albert Namatjira’s artwork and advocacy has expanded to film, performance, installation and public art, beginning with the Namatjira project, an eight-year social change experiment with Big hART theatre group and the Namatjira family that combined professional theatre and a successful copyright and intellectual property campaign.

Notes:

  1. Mervyn Rubuntja, The Art of Healing: Australian Indigenous Bush Medicine, edited by Jacqueline Healy, Melbourne University Medical Museum, 2012, p.46.
  2. The alcohol industry is currently lobbying the Federal Government to remove the payment of excise tax. This will drop the unit price and enable “cheaper” grog. See FARE objection to the Treasurer from 80 health organisations
  3. Woolworths / Damn Murphy writes NT alcohol policy, non? The NT is not unique in collusion with big grog. A report has found NT government legislation resembled a proposal by a liquor retailer: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-10/nt-government-disagrees-dan-murphys-endeavour-drinks-report/100205146 

About the Artists

Benita Clements (b.1980): is the great granddaughter of Albert Namatjira and daughter of artist Gwenda Namatjira (deceased). Clements paints her Country in the vibrant colours reflected in the landscape. Her recent work juxtaposes traditional Hermannsburg landscapes with symbols from contemporary culture. In 2017 her work was exhibited in group shows What if this photograph is by Albert Namatjira? at the Tarnanthi Festival, Art Gallery of SA and A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness, at ACCA in 2018.

Selma Nunay Coulthard (b.1954): grew up in Hermannsburg and went to school with artist Ivy Pareroultja. She has a kinship relationship. Watching the Namatjira brothers paining in Ntaria inspired her to be an artist. She is an accomplished painter in watercolour and acrylic.

Dellina Inkamala (b.1984): lives and works Mparntwe (Alice Springs). Delllina Inkamala is the daughter of Raelene Inkamala who is Kathy Inkamala’s older sister, and Hillary Pareroultja who is Hubert Pareroultja’s younger brother. Dellina drew in school and began to paint dot paintings when she left school. Her interest in watercolour painting came leter, “as I can see the view of my country come alive in my paintings”. Dellina participated in Homeless on my Homeland, NIRIN 22nd Biennale of Sydney, Sydney, 2020 and in an associated watercolour workshop at The Cross Art Projects.

Dianne Inkamala (b.1971): is sister to Vanessa Inkamala and to her brother Reinhold Inkamala both respected painters at the art centre.

Reinhold Inkamala (b. 1974): his great-uncle is Albert Namatjira and Vanessa Inkamala is his sister. He is known for imaginative and witty watercolour paintings.

Vanessa Inkamala (b. 1968): grew up at Ntaria (Hermannsburg). Her grandmother’s brother is Albert Namatjira. She is the niece of award winning artist Ivy Pareroultja who nursed Vanessa and her brother Reinhold Inkamala, both painters.

Chips Mackinolty (b. 1954 in Sydney): lives and works in Mparntwe and Darwin. Chips is revered as Australia’s leading politically inspired artist.

Marisa Maher: is a Western Aranda woman and Iltja Ntjarra’s assistant manager where she has curated over twenty exhibitions since 2014.

Mervyn Rubuntja (b 1958 in Mparntwe), continues a tradition of “land rights painting” begun by his father Wenten Rubuntja (deceased), an important political leader, chair of the Central Land Council and senior lawman. Albert Namatjira taught his father to paint. As well as his father’s example, Meryvn Rubuntja learned to paint in both watercolour and acrylic traditions from a notable list of senior male artists including Oscar, Maurice and Keith Namatjira, Basil Tontji and Arnulf Ebantarinja His broad knowledge of historical, cultural, environmental and social issues, and the interpretation of Aboriginal and Western cultural systems informs his artistic practice. His work was shown in The Endurance Of Bush Medicine at the Medical History Museum, University of Melbourne and he led Particulate Matter: A Fossil Fueled Future? at the Cross Art Projects in association with Homeless at Sydney Biennale in 2020. In 2021 Hubert Pareroultja and Mervyn Rubuntja collaborated on a large-scale work, ‘Through the veil of time’, and won the Wandjuk Marika 3D Memorial Award at NATSIAA, Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory in Darwin.

Betty Wheeler Namatjira, is Namatjira’s living granddaughter and was raised by Albert and his first wife Rubina.

Marcus Wheeler, is married to Betty Wheeler (Albert Namatjira’s granddaughter) and is a pastor in Ntaria/Hermannsburg. They live with their extended family on an outstation near Ntaria/Hermannsburg. In 2017 he participated in What if this photograph is by Albert Namatjira?, Art Gallery of SA, Adelaide presented as part of Tarnanthi Festival.

References

The Art of Healing: Australian Indigenous Bush Medicine, edited by Jacqueline Healy, 2012.

Mervyn Rubuntja interviewed by Iltja Ntjarra on The Central Australian Aboriginal healing centre known as Akeyulerre was established in

the 1980s. At https://culturalcommons.edu.au/cms/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/09_bush-med-reprint-ebook.pdf

Groggy (NCCA, Darwin 2013), exhibition review by Cath Bowdler in Artlink issue 4, December 2013.

Marcia Langton, ‘Rum, seduction and death: Aboriginality and Alcohol’, in Oceania, March 1993. Online.

Initiatives in Mparntwe (Alice Springs).

Akeyulerre Healing Centre, see www.akeyulerre.org.au.

CAAAPU, Central Australian Aboriginal Alcohol Programs Unit: culturally appropriate rehabilitation, see http://www.caaapu.org.au/

FARE: peak health professional and education group, see https://fare.org.au/ 

PAAC Peoples’s Alcohol Action Coalition, instigated in 1995 following a public rally on alcohol problems initiated by the late Dr Charles Perkins. see www.paac.org.au / PAAC on Facebook

Acknowledgements
We acknowledge we are on the land of the Gadigal people; land that was never ceded.

Thanks to speakers: Patricia Adjei, Arts Practice Director First Nations Arts and Culture, Australia Council; Ken McGregor, author of A life and times of Albert Namatjira (2021), Iris Bendor, Itlja Ntjarra, manager. Michael Kempson of Cicada Press at UNSW, on prints made by the artists in 2016 and 2019.  Thanks to Curators: Selma Coulthard, Marisa Maher and Iltja Ntjarra assisted by Jo Holder and Belle Blau. Thanks To the artists and Iltja Ntjarra Art Centre: Iris Bendor, Marisa Maher and Koren Wheatley and Georges Bureau. Research assistance: Dr Jacqueline Healy a Melbourne University Medical Museum, Chips Mackinolty at AMSANT and Vicki Gilligan at People's Alcohol Action Coalition (PAAC), a community-based response to growing awareness of excessive alcohol use and associated harm in the central Australian region. The Cross Art Projects: Belle Blau, Simon Blau, Phillip Boulten and Susan Gilligan.

Notes: the artists and co-curators of One Too Many will attend the exhibition, in conjunction with the Biennale of Sydney, once the Covid crisis in Mparntwe (Alice Springs) stabilises.  Chips Mackinolty at AMSANT. Profits from the sale of A life and times of Albert Namatjira go to Iltja Ntjarra Many Hands Art Centre. 

Links & Downloads

The Art of Healing, Mervyn Rubuntja > Download as pdf

The Art of Healing: Australian Indigenous Bush Medicine, edited by Jacqueline Healy, 2012. Mervyn Rubuntja interview written with the use of David Roennfeldt (ed.), Western Arrarnta picture dictionary, Alice Springs: IAD Press, 2006. In, at https://culturalcommons.edu.au/cms/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/09_bush-med-reprint-ebook.pdf 

Watch the short film ‘Pmarra Nurna-kanha Ntarntarai - Care for our Country’: https://vimeo.com/680713927/79248ad8a3 and explore Rivus at https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/

Iltja Ntjarra, ‘enough is enough ‘ campaign 2016. See here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkgYVsD2bv8

Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022       Art Exhibition at The Cross Art Projects. One Too Many, 2022